This is the official blog of Sgt Ellie Bloggs, a real live police sergeant on the front line of England. It's not the official opinion of my police force, but all the facts I recount are true, and are not secrets. If they don't want me blogging about it, they shouldn't do it. PS If you don't pay tax, you don't pay my salary.


(All proceeds from Google Ads will be donated to the Police Roll of Honour Trust)

Tuesday, November 27, 2007

Know Your Place

You hear a lot these days about the loss of the Village Bobby. The Bobby Knew His Patch. He Knew the Criminals. The sense is that this mythical bobby used to snap his fingers and solve burglaries, robberies and vandalism without ever breaking his pen out of his pencil case.

I work on a team of 6-8 (depending on the time of year) response officers covering a town of 80-100,000 (depending on who's in charge of counting) residents. Our "Patch" is Blandmore and its surrounding villages. Admittedly, we don't walk down each street and catch people in the act of burgling all too often. But we most certainly DO know the local baddies. After about a year in any area, most response officers will know who the villains are. They'll probably even know which of them has done a particular crime.

The problem is, where the old finger-snapping used to be enough to haul Billy Burglar before the courts, now there are these pesky obstructions known as "evidence-gathering" and "the Codes of Practice" which get in the way of popping round to Billy's house and dragging him by the ear in front of a magistrate.

Despite this, the general consensus is that Bringing Back the Bobby is the way forwards. To this end, Blandshire Constabulary have "rolled out" Neighbourhood Policing across most of the force area. In understanding what this means, you should think of Blandshire's uniformed PCs as a kind of ball of dough. We are gradually being "rolled out" to cover every inch of our several counties.

The only trouble is, the dough is getting thinner and thinner in the process.



Ellie's not keen on the roll-out idea.








---------------------------------------------------------
Copyright of PC Bloggs.

14 Comments:

Anonymous US Detective Sergeant said...

Constable Ellie;

You are absolutely correct. Community based policing is a "flavor of the day" police strategy from the dream palace of police academics.

It redeploys resources that you don't have and breaks up effective operations for the sake of a feel good press release.

The only way you guys are going to take back the streets is for your political leadership to order your police leadership to take some risks and let you kick-ass, no non-sense cops loose on the populace that cause the problems. Every good street cop will have their names and where they hang out in their little black book.

Someone needs to say: go get'em! Only then will there be peace in the valley.

28 November, 2007 00:33

 
Blogger alanorei said...

Dear PC Bloggs,

I think this is on-topic because your latest post seems to relate in part to the broadcast on BBC Radio 4 this morning of You and Yours.

You probably have heard the broadcast. Indeed, you were most likely consulted about it because the introduction consisted of an extract from (I guess) your book, read out (I guess) by an actress with (I guess) a Blandmore accent.

In any case, well done for making it onto this comparitively high profile programme.

I shall try to summarise my impressions of the programme, in case others who may have heard it may wish to forward their comments.

And to be as brief as possible, without omitting anything of note.

You were distinctly introduced as "PC Ellie Bloggs."

Your extract covered the extensive paper-trail described in an earlier post, i.e. the bureaucracy.

Two prominent guests on the programme, the Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police and a distinguished Professor of Criminology, were asked about your extract.

They agreed it was authentic - or at least the CC did. He said that he "recognised the territory," apart from "some cynicism and rhetoric." (Well, you are an author.)

Near the start of the programme, the view of politicians was reported that crime is falling.

(This is not true according to Home Office figures. Maybe the politicians use a different set of figures, or manipulate British Crime Survey figures.)

The guests did make the point that the police were thinly spread, in spite of government insistence that 143,000 extra police have been deployed in recent years. The reporter asked, "Where are they all?" and the Professor said that more and more police were working on "major issues," e.g. (I think) foiling potential terrorist threats etc.

The police were therefore "less visible" and what was needed was "a means of rebuilding trust" but it wasn't clear how this would be accomplished.

One suggestion was that the bureaucracy could be centralised (somehow). Apparently, all 43 forces in the country (or many of them) have different IT systems, which seems incredible but that is clearly a big hindrance to this kind of centralisation.

Police have also had "critical responsibilities" taken away from them and these need to be restored (somehow).

It was also suggested that more civilian staff could be employed for roles that didn't require police training, e.g. for the paper-trail and victim support but also making house-to-house enquiries and for certain security positions (provided they aren't filled by more illegal immigrants, I suppose).

Unfortunately, the Professor pointed out that this might not be the way forward because people were reluctant to volunteer for these sorts of posts.

PCSOs were discussed, of course. It appears they are to have their powers extended (to deal with under-18s(?) - not sure on this point).

(One strange thing I found out from the police surgery I attended was that a PCSO can't directly transfer to the force. He/she has to resign and then go the usual route as a probationer. This seems inefficient to me.)

Calls from the public were taken and emails were read out.

Regrettably, they were mostly negative - although we can't know how the BBC edited these contributions.

However, one woman from Andover had nothing but praise for her local force in the way that they tackled nuisance under-age drinkers in her area.

And another emailer spoke in favour of the extensive paper-trail, which might have averted the Soham murders if it had been efficiently maintained.

But another woman reported being harassed by ten youths when her motor bike broke down and a slow police response, yielding an unsatisfactory outcome, i.e the yobs weren't caught.

Callers/emailers from as far apart as Somerset (Frome) and North Yorkshire reported a severely reduced police presence, which was worrying.

So public perceptions (as reported by the BBC) don't harmonise with those of the politicians.

The aspiration of policing, nevertheless, was still there.

The Professor (I think) referred to an early episode of The Bill, where a senior police officer says to a young recruit (words to this effect), "Five percent of the population are rubbish. It is our job to keep them from giving grief to the other ninety-five percent."

I wish you and your colleagues every success in this respect. As indicated, at least the matter has not been allowed to die down and neither should it be.

P.S. I found out today from a separate source why you all wear stab-proof vests at all times, even when addressing a Brownie pack (which the PCSO did while we were speaking with the PC at the surgery). You aren't covered by insurance, otherwise. I think this is useful for other MOPs to know.

28 November, 2007 00:41

 
Blogger Paradise Driver said...

Community based policing is a concept that was introducted in the US over the past decade. It comes with all sorts of "buzz" words and Federal funds. It hasn't stopped one bit of crime. Go to any American Police Department website and in the "Message from the Chief" you'll read how their community is actively involved in this community policing crap.

As the prior poster said, its the "Flavor of the Day".

What we need today is "Gitmo" enforcement techniques. Since most gov'ts sanction these rather brutal interrogation methods, why not bring it down to the street cop level. Hell, it was that way before the '60s.

28 November, 2007 00:43

 
Anonymous PC Hadenough said...

Policing is really quite simple, but we appear to have made it very complicated.

When I joined 20 yrs ago we had large reliefs (i.e teams of officers) of about 25 to 30 in number for each 8hr shift.

These teams were run and I mean run by an Inspector and a couple of Sgts. Once all the response cars were manned the remaining officers were posted walking to specific beats or were deployed to police specific tasks highlighted by intelligence.

This intelligence usually came from the permenant beat officers (2officers per ward)whose job was mainly 9-5 walking the neighbourhoods and who were known by everybody. They gained the trust of the locals who were confident that the information given would be acted upon.

It worked.

Now we have Neighbourhood policing - which is a con. PCSO's are policing on the cheap and the thin end of the wedge. The gov't has found a way of putting uniforms on the street to give the impression that there are loads of us out there. (Is it just a coincidence that PCSO uniforms differ minutely from regular officers?).

On my division we have a 'bike team', a 'problem solving team' a 'task force team'. All these teams work mainly weekdays/evenings and are taken from uniform response teams. The Chief Supt refers to them as his 'detection teams' i.e it seems they exist to get as many S5's or cannabis warnings as they can in order to make the division appear it is doing really, really well.

In the meantime the stripped response teams are doing all the work the public want them to be doing i.e. responding to calls taken on the 999 system which the above mentioned 'teams' manage to ignore.

Last week I responded to a call at 2am on a Sun morning. The caller was being harrassed by local youths every night. He was tired of it and after I had referred him to his 'Local Neighbourhood Officer' he looked at me, shrugged, and said "What's the point of that, they are never out at 2am on the weekend"

28 November, 2007 13:21

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

When the bobby on the beat used to work they lived within the community in a Police house and everyone knew who they were. Now officers live where they can afford and travel, this therefore devalues the impact of neighbourhood policing as when off duty in my area no one covers. Therefore after 4 rest days back to a stack of e-mails about anti-social behaviour that i haven't got a cat in hells chance of sorting out 99% of the time. The principle may seem reasonable it's just that the model doesn't work.

28 November, 2007 14:13

 
Anonymous Inspector Gadget said...

6 - 8 officers on a team? have you got the entire uniformed frontline strength for the Division on your team then? eh, eh?

28 November, 2007 17:49

 
Blogger alanorei said...

For info:

Re: team

Our ward of about 3,000 houses, i.e. about 6,000+ inhabitants, has a police team of two - a veteran PC of 27 years' service and a PCSO (a solidly good lad, as far as I can tell).

We are nearly all well-behaved, middle-class professional folks in our ward (with a good percentage of middle-aged to elderly folks), who care about their children and invest in them (according to our veteran PC - with whom the local villains are known to exchange pleasantries on the high street, apparently, or were once).

i.e. we don't kick off like the M****m rioters in Paris and our kids are not inveterate binge drinkers (in public, anyway).

Maybe for these reasons, the police resources in our ward are not going to increase (according to our veteran PC).

Overall, our town, of 20,000+ inhabitants, has a team of three PCs and three PCSOs and is overseen by an Inspector and a Sergeant.

Some parts are more volatile than our area but not much, by and large. So our team on the whole seems about average, from the above comments.

Though it's certainly better than the situation that PC Dave/Stu was faced with on his first day on the job, when he was one out of four officers available to police the entire town of Burton-on-Trent with 60,000 inhabitants.

It would therefore be good if the extra 143,000 officers now available, according to impeccable sources, could be deployed a bit more widely.

Some areas do seem to be a bit thin on the ground, w.r.t. police resources.

28 November, 2007 19:47

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Man treated after chemical blast
A man was taken to hospital in Swindon after a chemical explosion at his home on Wednesday.

Fire crews were called to Earl's Close in Middleaze after the man had an accident with chemicals, including caustic soda, in his shed.

He suffered slight burns to his face, and several residents were briefly removed from their homes.

Swindon police said there was no indication that any criminal offence took place. An inquiry is under way.

It was thought the man was trying to produce bio-diesel when the explosion occurred.

The man, who did not want to be named, told BBC News: "I'm seriously thinking of packing it up because of all the fuss that I have seen.

"I have never seen people with chemical masks - I have only seen them in films. Now I've seen them by my house - that tells me that no, I'm not doing it."

28 November, 2007 21:19

 
Blogger Stan Still said...

How lucky are we?

In our area of approximately 140000, we have response teams with around 23 officers and three sergeants. In addition, we have the Neighbourhood Teams. Plus the Special Constabulary and PCSOs.

We're spoiled - but you're not having any of them in Blandmore.

30 November, 2007 15:37

 
Blogger Howard Wilson said...

Once upon a time, when I was growing up we had a copper (who I knew as Mr Dodds) who lived in a Police House and covered the four local villages. I don't know how effective Mr Dodds was, but we were a community where everyone knew one another and Mr Doods was part of that community. If you had a problem, you would see Mr Dodds and if he discovered a problem, then woe betide you, as he would definately see you, plus you had the shame if the 'news' became common knowledge in the community!

Thirty years later, that's all gone, we've had the destruction of our communities with Thacherism, now ten years of bugger all with bLAIR, we're all 'mops' and you're all 'pigs'. Community Policing is 'right on' crap, but it's a start.

26 December, 2007 04:59

 
Blogger 成人 said...

成人電影,情色,本土自拍, 一夜情, 辣妹視訊, 視訊聊天室, 免費視訊聊天, 免費視訊, 視訊, 視訊美女, 美女視訊, 視訊交友, 視訊聊天, 免費視訊聊天室, 情人視訊網影音視訊聊天室, 視訊交友90739, 成人影片, 成人交友, 本土自拍, 免費A片下載, 性愛,
成人交友, 嘟嘟成人網, 成人電影, 成人, 成人貼圖, 成人小說, 成人文章, 成人圖片區, 免費成人影片, 成人遊戲, 微風成人, 愛情公寓, 情色, 情色貼圖, 情色文學, 做愛, 色情聊天室, 美女交友,

嘟嘟成人網, 成人貼圖, 成人電影, A片, 豆豆聊天室, 聊天室, UT聊天室, 尋夢園聊天室, 男同志聊天室, UT男同志聊天室, 聊天室尋夢園, 080聊天室, 080苗栗人聊天室, 6K聊天室, 女同志聊天室, 小高聊天室, 情色論壇, 色情網站, 成人網站, 成人論壇, 免費A片, 上班族聊天室, 成人聊天室, 成人小說, 微風成人區, 色美媚部落格, 成人文章, 成人圖片區, 免費成人影片, 成人論壇, 情色聊天室, 寄情築園小遊戲, AV女優,成人電影,情色,本土自拍, A片下載, 日本A片, 麗的色遊戲, 色色網, ,嘟嘟情人色網, 色情網站, 成人網站, 正妹牆, 正妹百人斬, aio,伊莉, 伊莉討論區, 成人遊戲, 成人影城,
ut聊天室, 免費A片, AV女優, 美女視訊, 情色交友, 免費AV, 色情網站, 辣妹視訊, 美女交友, 色情影片 成人影片, 成人網站, A片,H漫, 18成人, 成人圖片, 成人漫畫, 情色網, 日本A片,

愛情公寓, 情色, 舊情人, 情色貼圖, 情色文學, 情色交友, 色情聊天室, 色情小說, 一葉情貼圖片區, 情色小說, 色情, 色情遊戲, 情色視訊, 情色電影, aio交友愛情館, 色情a片, 色情小說, 一葉情貼圖片區, 情色小說, 色情, 寄情築園小遊戲, 色情遊戲情色視訊, 情色電影, aio交友愛情館, 言情小說, 愛情小說, 色情A片, 情色論壇, 色情影片, 視訊聊天室, 免費視訊聊天, 免費視訊, 視訊美女, 視訊交友, 視訊聊天, 免費視訊聊天室, a片下載, aV, av片, A漫, av dvd, av成人網, 聊天室, 成人論壇, 本土自拍, 自拍, A片,成人電影,情色,本土自拍,

03 April, 2009 20:42

 
Blogger look said...

免費A片, 本土自拍, AV女優, 美女視訊, 情色交友, 免費AV, 色情網站, 辣妹視訊, 美女交友, 色情影片, 成人影片, 成人網站, A片,H漫, 18成人, 成人圖片, 成人漫畫, 情色網, 日本A片, 免費A片下載, 性愛, 成人交友, 嘟嘟成人網, 成人電影, 成人, 成人貼圖, 成人小說, 成人文章, 成人圖片區, 免費成人影片, 成人遊戲, 微風成人, 愛情公寓, 情色, 情色貼圖, 情色文學, 做愛, 色情聊天室, 色情小說, 一葉情貼圖片區, 情色小說, 色情, 寄情築園小遊戲, 色情遊戲, 情色視訊,

情色電影, aio交友愛情館, 言情小說, 愛情小說, 色情A片, 情色論壇, 色情影片, 視訊聊天室, 免費視訊聊天, 免費視訊, 視訊美女, 視訊交友, ut聊天室, 視訊聊天, 免費視訊聊天室, a片下載, av片, A漫, av dvd, av成人網, 聊天室, 成人論壇, 本土自拍, 自拍, A片, 愛情公寓, 情色, 舊情人, 情色貼圖, 情色文學, 情色交友, 色情聊天室, 色情小說, 一葉情貼圖片區, 情色小說, 色情, 色情遊戲, 情色視訊, 情色電影, aio交友愛情館, 色情a片, 一夜情, 辣妹視訊, 視訊聊天室, 免費視訊聊天, 免費視訊, 視訊, 視訊美女, 美女視訊, 視訊交友, 視訊聊天, 免費視訊聊天室, 情人視訊網, 影音視訊聊天室, 視訊交友90739, 成人影片, 成人交友,

15 April, 2009 01:56

 
Blogger liwo said...

爆爆爽a片免費看, 天堂私服論壇, 情色電影下載, 成人短片, 麗的線上情色小遊戲, 情色動畫免費下載, 日本女優, 小說論壇, 777成人區, showlive影音聊天網, 聊天室尋夢園, 義大利女星寫真集, 韓國a片, 熟女人妻援交, 0204成人, 性感內衣模特兒, 影片, 情色卡通, 85cc免費影城85cc, 本土自拍照片, 成人漫畫區, 18禁, 情人節阿性, 做愛的漫畫圖片, 情色電影分享區, 做愛ㄉ影片, 丁字褲美女寫真, 色美眉, 自拍俱樂部首頁, 日本偷自拍圖片, 色情做愛影片, 情色貼圖區, 八國聯軍情色網, 免費線上a片, 淫蕩女孩自拍, 美國a片, 都都成人站, 色情自拍, 本土自拍照片, 熊貓貼圖區, 色情影片, 5278影片網, 脫星寫真圖片, 粉喵聊天室, 金瓶梅18, sex888影片分享區, 1007視訊, 雙贏論壇,

免費成人影音, 彩虹自拍, 小魔女貼影片, 自拍裸體寫真, 禿頭俱樂部, 環球av影音城, 學生色情聊天室, 視訊美女, 辣妹情色圖, 性感卡通美女圖片, 影音, 情色照片 做愛, hilive tv , 忘年之交聊天室, 制服美女, 性感辣妹, ut 女同聊天室, 淫蕩自拍, 處女貼圖貼片區, 聊天ukiss tw, 亞亞成人館, 777成人, 秋瓷炫裸體寫真, 淫蕩天使貼圖, 十八禁成人影音, 禁地論壇, 洪爺淫蕩自拍, 秘書自拍圖片,

aaaa片, 免費聊天, 咆哮小老鼠影片分享區, 金瓶梅影片, av女優王國, 78論壇, 女同聊天室, 熟女貼圖, 1069壞朋友論壇gay, 淫蕩少女總部, 日本情色派, 平水相逢, 黑澀會美眉無名, 網路小說免費看, 999東洋成人, 免費視訊聊天, 情色電影分享區, 9k躺伯虎聊天室, 傑克論壇, 日本女星杉本彩寫真, 自拍電影免費下載, a片論壇, 情色短片試看, 素人自拍寫真,

15 April, 2009 09:00

 
Blogger liwo said...

爆爆爽a片免費看, 天堂私服論壇, 情色電影下載, 成人短片, 麗的線上情色小遊戲, 情色動畫免費下載, 日本女優, 小說論壇, 777成人區, showlive影音聊天網, 聊天室尋夢園, 義大利女星寫真集, 韓國a片, 熟女人妻援交, 0204成人, 性感內衣模特兒, 影片, 情色卡通, 85cc免費影城85cc, 本土自拍照片, 成人漫畫區, 18禁, 情人節阿性, 做愛的漫畫圖片, 情色電影分享區, 做愛ㄉ影片, 丁字褲美女寫真, 色美眉, 自拍俱樂部首頁, 日本偷自拍圖片, 色情做愛影片, 情色貼圖區, 八國聯軍情色網, 免費線上a片, 淫蕩女孩自拍, 美國a片, 都都成人站, 色情自拍, 本土自拍照片, 熊貓貼圖區, 色情影片, 5278影片網, 脫星寫真圖片, 粉喵聊天室, 金瓶梅18, sex888影片分享區, 1007視訊, 雙贏論壇,

免費成人影音, 彩虹自拍, 小魔女貼影片, 自拍裸體寫真, 禿頭俱樂部, 環球av影音城, 學生色情聊天室, 視訊美女, 辣妹情色圖, 性感卡通美女圖片, 影音, 情色照片 做愛, hilive tv , 忘年之交聊天室, 制服美女, 性感辣妹, ut 女同聊天室, 淫蕩自拍, 處女貼圖貼片區, 聊天ukiss tw, 亞亞成人館, 777成人, 秋瓷炫裸體寫真, 淫蕩天使貼圖, 十八禁成人影音, 禁地論壇, 洪爺淫蕩自拍, 秘書自拍圖片,

aaaa片, 免費聊天, 咆哮小老鼠影片分享區, 金瓶梅影片, av女優王國, 78論壇, 女同聊天室, 熟女貼圖, 1069壞朋友論壇gay, 淫蕩少女總部, 日本情色派, 平水相逢, 黑澀會美眉無名, 網路小說免費看, 999東洋成人, 免費視訊聊天, 情色電影分享區, 9k躺伯虎聊天室, 傑克論壇, 日本女星杉本彩寫真, 自拍電影免費下載, a片論壇, 情色短片試看, 素人自拍寫真,

15 April, 2009 09:43

 

Post a Comment

<< Home

 

View My Stats
eXTReMe Tracker